Logitech Lift: A smaller, less expensive model of the vertical mouse!

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You’ll likely know whether you like or dislike the Logitech Lift mouse a moment you get your hands on it. The Lift, like the Logitech MX Vertical, flips the traditional mouse design on its head — or, more correctly, on its side. When you utilize this accessory, you’ll hold it in your hand at a 90-degree angle, similar to how you’d hold a coffee cup. That will either be fascinating or bothersome, depending on your preferences. There’s a lot to enjoy about the Logitech Lift vertical mouse if you get beyond its unusual appearance. The Lift, like other Logitech mice, is packed with functionality, from additional buttons to simply switchable settings. The gadget has a long battery life and is available in a variety of color combinations. It’s also less expensive than Logitech’s other high-end productivity mouse, at $69.

The Lift, on the other hand, is based on buggy software and may just shift wrist discomfort rather than eliminate it.

Price and availability

Logitech Lift: Price and availability

This Logitech Lift Vertical Ergonomic Mouse is now available for purchase and costs $69 in the United States, £69 in the United Kingdom, and AU$130 in Australia.

Design

Design

The Logitech Lift isn’t designed like a regular mouse, which is the first thing you’ll notice. Instead, the Lift is a “vertical mouse,” which is just a standard mouse turned on its side. This implies that the bulk of the buttons on the Lift is on the right side, and you’ll be holding it with a different grip.

Vertical mice, in general, can help users with carpal tunnel syndrome and other wrist difficulties since they don’t exert too much strain on the carpal ligament. It’s worth noting, though, that Logitech makes no medical claims regarding the Lift, and that an ergonomic mouse isn’t guaranteed to relieve any problems.

After you get over the Lift’s odd design, you’ll find that it offers all of the functionality you’d anticipate from such a high-end Logitech mouse. The right-click button, a left-click button, a responsive scroll wheel, and a tiny circular button that decreases cursor speed by default are all on the face. Locate the two programmable thumb buttons on the mouse’s left side. A power button, a  profile-switching button, and the battery compartment, which holds one AA battery but a wireless USB dongle, are all found beneath.

The Lift is available in three color combinations: Pale Grey (white & off), Graphite (black & grey), and Rose (red+ pink) It’s nice to see a little variation in this category, as productivity gear is generally all black, the all-time.

Logitech Lift: Features

Logitech Lift: Features

Above all, the Logitech Lift‘s unique design distinguishes it from competing productivity mouse. While this profile was seen before and in the MX Vertical, the MX Vertical also was a considerably larger mouse. Vertical mice aren’t all that common, and “vertical mouse that is high-end productivity peripherals” are rarer. The Lift may be your only option if you ever want a small-to-medium vertical mouse out of a large brand with a lot of software options.

However, if you prepare to put forth some effort, the Lift has a few more noteworthy features. To begin, there’s the “easy-switch” feature, which is there on the majority of Logitech’s premium productivity mouse. You may use the Lift with 3 different devices at the same time, such as a desktop, a laptop, and a tablet. Because the gadget has both Bluetooth & USB wireless capabilities, this is a simple task. When you wish to switch between devices, just push a button on the mouse’s bottom. It’s a clever, painless function that has real-world implications for users with several PCs.

Performance

Performance of vertical mouse by logitech

After using the Lift as a primary mouse for the greater part of a week, you have mixed thoughts about it. Despite its unique form, the Logitech Lift is surprisingly intuitive and simple to operate. You were able to browse the Internet, type Word documents, listen to music, speak on Slack, and generally move around Windows after you got used to holding your palm sideways. The Lift is a capable productivity mouse with a few useful add-ons.

However, you had the identical issue with the Lift as you had with the MX Vertical: a single point of pressure on the wrist. Although the Lift did not apply pressure to the bottom of my wrist. There was still a point of contact here between the side of my wrist and the mouse pad. As a result, utilizing the Lift created discomfort over time. Although in a different location than accustom you to. There’s no “learning curve” to holding the mouse differently; it was simply the position you like.

You spoke about this with a Logitech official, who said that just as a standard mouse isn’t comfortable for everyone, a vertical mouse isn’t either. The Lift isn’t meant to be a cure-all for everyone who has ever suffered from wrist discomfort; it’s merely another alternative worth considering. As a result, you’d strongly advise you to attempt to get your hands here on Lift, or a similar vertical mouse, before spending $70 on it.

Logi Options+Software

It’s also worth mentioning the Logi Options+ software, which utilizes to control several of the Logitech Lift extra functions. Although this software is in beta, it allows you to perform everything that the former tool, Logi Options, allowed you to do. Its dots-per-inch (DPI) sensitivity should adjust. Albeit Options+ refers to it as “pointer speed” & uses percentages rather than numbers. This is a setback for power users, however, it may be more understandable for newcomers.

Options+ also allows you to remap buttons, albeit this is a hit-or-miss function. You have a lot of options for every button if you want to build a profile from scratch, from launching apps to panning left & right through a file. Options+, on the other hand, may create automated profiles, that don’t always download correctly. Users would have to wait for a patch or program profiles themselves because it is beta software.

Finally, Options+ enables you to use Flow, which allows you to effortlessly scroll between numerous computer displays while also allowing you to drag & drop files. This is useful if you have a desktop but a laptop next to each other. But it’s not a must-have feature otherwise.

Battery life

Battery life of logitech lift vertical mouse

The Lift’s battery is a kind of a two-edged sword. The Lift, according to Logitech, could last up to 24 months on either a single charge. However, the firm does not indicate under what conditions this is possible. After several days of continuous office usage, the charge did not dip below 100 percent. If the mouse loses 1% of its charge per week, it would be in line with Logitech’s estimate.

Having to replace batteries in a luxury mouse, on the other hand, feels a little outmoded and wasteful. Many mouse in this price range includes rechargeable batteries, like Logitech’s own MX Anywhere 3.

Conclusion

The Logitech Lift vertical mouse features a unique design that may not be suitable for everyone. There are a few software bugs to work out, as well as a rechargeable battery would’ve been excellent. Still, there’s a lot to have a praise about the Lift. The Lift is a wonderful supplement for extreme productivity & general computing alike. Thanks to its attractive appearance, good performance, and useful added functions.

Users with larger hands will most likely choose the MX Vertical. While classic mouse lovers may prefer the Logitech MX Master 3. If you have tiny hands and/or wrist difficulties, the Lift is a good option.

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